CA Technologies: 3 DevOps Predictions for 2017
The hottest trends in DevOps aren't specifically about dev or ops
December 30, 2016

Aruna Ravichandran
CA Technologies

A lot of time, resources and energy has been invested over the past few years on de-siloing development and operations. And with good reason. DevOps is enabling organizations to more aggressively increase their digital agility, while at the same time reducing digital costs and risks.

But as 2017 approaches, the hottest trends in DevOps aren’t specifically about dev or ops. They’re about testing, security, and metrics.

1. Continuous testing becomes a top topic of interest in 2017

The rapid promotion of new code into production is a noble goal, but it can also be an express ticket to digital failure. DevOps success requires not just speed, but also quality—that means the rapid promotion of really, really good code. And the only way to ensure that your code is really, really good is to test it, continuously.

We all intuitively know the value of testing. But the accelerated pace of development that comes with successful DevOps practices place increased pressure on the testing function. Leaving testing as a single phase within the software development lifecycle (SDLC) is no longer sufficient.

As the business risk associated with less-than-perfect code increases, as customer expectations regarding digital experiences continue to escalate, and competitors also become more digitally adept, good-enough testing is ceasing to be good enough. Testing has to be more rigorous, and most importantly – it needs to be pervasive across the DevOps lifecycle. Testing can longer only be the domain of QA engineers. Developers need to have the ability to test code as it’s produced—what’s known as shift left testing. Testing has to be faster and more automated. And in addition to “shift left” testing, testing and test results also have to be made available to the operations.

Testing has become the main constraint when it comes to speed with quality at scale. So expect continuous testing to be a top topic of interest in 2017.

2. The unification of development, security and operations – DevSecOps

Another great way to undermine your digital business is to rapidly promote code that perfectly fulfills all of your functional requirements, that efficiently performs at scale … and that leaves you excessively vulnerable to cyber-malice.

So success requires not just speed, but also ensuring that quality, functional requirements AND security needs are met. This means another cultural shift must happen: making sure Security is engaged early with DevOps. Given the increasing intensity and sophistication of attackers — and how rapidly digital compromises turn into bad publicity and potentially irreparable brand damage — code cannot be good without being safe and deployed within a solid security architecture.

As microservices and SDKs evolve, it will be easier for developers to build in security from the start, without taking their focus off of a great user experience. But when it comes to testing and deploying the code, security validation should be viewed as a special case of testing as the requirements of security-related code testing are highly idiosyncratic and dynamic and will likely involve experts and constituencies (e.g. governance, risk and compliance teams) not normally part of the DevOps process.

3. 2017 will bring an increasing focus on metrics

It’s no surprise that until recently, very few IT organizations have paid attention to DevOps metrics. After all, for a number or organizations, it’s been tough enough just getting basic DevOps processes, tools, and culture in place. However, you can’t improve what you can’t measure. So as agile development and DevOps processes continue to expand, expect to see some real progress on both the adoption and the standardization of DevOps success metrics.

Now that there is a critical mass of successful DevOps implementations – as well as some organizations who are starting to evolve into Continuous Delivery — organizations will look to refine practices through iterative, metrics-driven management.

Metrics can help improve digital practices in several ways. Collective metrics can help discover process bottlenecks, optimize resource allocation, and better configure DevOps toolchains. Individual metrics can help pinpoint coaching needs and replicate the behaviors of top performers.

As success measurement becomes increasingly important for DevOps, we are likely to see the industry coalesce around a common set of metrics. While 2016 has seen the industry take steps in this direction — as evidenced by the formation of the DevOps Express consortium — expect to see some real progress on both the adoption and the standardization of DevOps success metrics.

So, yes, in 2017 we will still see focus to some degree on DevOps itself. But as DevOps increases in maturity, we’ll see organizations keep pushing the envelope with more rigorous test automation, more sophisticated pre-production security controls, and great management-by-objective discipline across the DevOps lifecycle.

Aruna Ravichandran is VP, Product & Solutions Marketing, DevOps, CA Technologies

The Latest

September 18, 2017

Web development and web design are intertwined in such a way that there is not one without the other — not anymore at least. The following outlines 5 benefits of collaboration ...

September 14, 2017

Mastering modern software development by building a "Modern Software Factory" is at the heart of business success in the digital economy, according to the results of a survey of over 1,200 IT leaders released today by CA Technologies ...

September 13, 2017

IT-Business convergence is needed to deliver continuous change, but many of the current tools add complexity and fail to merge the two, according to the Panaya 2017 State of Functional Testing Report ...

September 11, 2017

Application Program Interfaces (API’s) represent an effective way to build and manage mobile services. By using APIs — a set of routines, protocols and tools for building software applications — application developers no longer have to buy technology software or hardware. Instead, they can simply plug into a growing open ecosystem of API-driven services. It is simple to integrate, and saves time and money for new developers ...

September 07, 2017

More than a quarter of enterprises globally have not built, customized or virtualized any mobile apps in the last 12 months, according to the latest mobile app survey by Gartner ...

September 06, 2017

The number of malware breaches (to use a generic term) are rising in near exponential numbers and, unless there are radical changes, this is set to continue unabated. Most pundits agree with this forecast ...

September 01, 2017

DevOps encourages communication and collaboration between development and operations teams. Achieving greater synergies between the Dev and Ops teams doesn't happen overnight, but it is possible to fast track the process with the right technologies in place. One such technology is IT automation ...

August 29, 2017

Newly released data shows that distributed denial of service (DDoS) and web application attacks are on the rise once again, according to the Second Quarter, 2017 State of the Internet / Security Report released by Akamai Technologies ...

August 28, 2017

Organizations that are actively managing the quality of open source components flowing into production applications are realizing a 28 percent improvement in developer productivity, a 30 percent reduction in overall development costs, and a 48 percent increase in application quality, according to the 2017 State of the Software Supply Chain Report from Sonatype ...

August 24, 2017

Being able to deploy distinct code elements quickly, matched with the ability to deploy the next release version or the previous version, facilitates moving forward, even on failure. The small program unit minimizes the production impact upon failure — maybe only a few people experience the problem instead of a large set of application users when large code deployments go wrong. Besides implementing small code segments, there are two additional reasons why fail forward has proven successful: continuous integration and testing ...

Share this